NAAEE Publication

IJECEE, Volume 7, Number 1
IJECEE, Volume 7, Number 1
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The International Journal of Early Childhood Environmental Education (IJECEE) is a peer-reviewed open-access electronic journal promoting early childhood environmental education for global readership and action. IJECEE publishes scholarly written work, anonymously and expertly reviewed by peers, that focuses on book reviews, educational approaches, evaluation models, program descriptions, research investigations, and theoretical perspectives pertinent to the education of all young children (birth to eight years). The young children’s caregivers and the communities, institutions and systems, in which the children live, too, are a focus of importance. The content of the publication addresses all aspects of environmental education as well as all reciprocal associations and impacts embedded within the environmental education experience. Implications for policy at the local, state, regional, national, and international levels are sought.

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Publication, NAAEE Publication, Journal
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How environmental education is conceptualized and implemented in elementary and secondary schools is critical if we are to meet our ultimate goal of environmental literacy. When all of the cross-references between the national standards and the environmental literacy framework as articulated in the Guidelines for Learning (K-12) are taken together, distinct patterns emerge. Learn more.

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Publication, NAAEE Publication
International Journal of Early Childhood Environmental Education, Volume 6, Number 3
Resource

The International Journal of Early Childhood Environmental Education (IJECEE) is a peer-reviewed open-access electronic journal promoting early childhood environmental education for global readership and action. IJECEE publishes scholarly written work, anonymously and expertly reviewed by peers, that focuses on book reviews, educational approaches, evaluation models, program descriptions, research investigations, and theoretical perspectives pertinent to the education of all young children (birth to eight years). The young children’s caregivers and the communities, institutions and systems, in which the children live, too, are a focus of importance. The content of the publication addresses all aspects of environmental education as well as all reciprocal associations and impacts embedded within the environmental education experience. Implications for policy at the local, state, regional, national, and international levels are sought.

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NAAEE Publication, Journal
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IJECEE, Volume 6, Number 2
IJECEE, Volume 6, Number 2
Resource
Moderator Endorsed: Early Childhood EE

The International Journal of Early Childhood Environmental Education (IJECEE) is a peer-reviewed open-access electronic journal promoting early childhood environmental education for global readership and action. IJECEE publishes scholarly written work, anonymously and expertly reviewed by peers, that focuses on book reviews, educational approaches, evaluation models, program descriptions, research investigations, and theoretical perspectives pertinent to the education of all young children (birth to eight years). The young children’s caregivers and the communities, institutions and systems, in which the children live, too, are a focus of importance. The content of the publication addresses all aspects of environmental education as well as all reciprocal associations and impacts embedded within the environmental education experience. Implications for policy at the local, state, regional, national, and international levels are sought.

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Publication, NAAEE Publication, Journal
Organization: 
Resource
Moderator Endorsed: Advocacy, Policy, and Civic Engagement
Moderator Endorsed: Advocacy, Policy, and Civic Engagement

eeAdvocate: An Advocacy Guide for Environmental Education Professionals & Supporters is designed to help you become a better and more confident advocate for environmental education (EE) and bring more support and funding to the field. For EE to reach its full potential, advocacy at all levels of government—local school boards, state legislatures, state and federal agencies, and federal Congressional and Senatorial outreach—is crucial. And no one is more qualified than educators themselves to help decision makers understand the benefits and impacts of EE programs on communities and individuals.

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Publication, NAAEE Publication
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Resource

Issue guides provide the overall framework for the deliberative discussion and help forum participants focus on alternative courses of action. Key to creating an issue guide is how it is framed - how the issue is defined and what alternative courses of actions are presented. Here you will find some resources to help you name and frame your own issues for deliberation.

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NAAEE Publication
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NAAEE Higher Education Accreditation
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NAAEE Accreditation: Distinguished College and University Programs formally recognizes high quality college and university programs that consistently prepare well–qualified environmental educators who possess the understanding, skills, and dispositions associated with environmental literacy, as well as the ability to apply them in their educational practices. For more information, including a set of Frequently Asked Questions about accreditation, visit https://naaee.org/our-work/programs/higher-education-accreditation

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NAAEE Publication
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NAAEE Accreditation
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Moderator Endorsed: Higher Education

NAAEE's Accreditation: Distinguished College and University Programs provides a means for recognizing institutions of higher education that provide programs that prepare high quality environmental education professionals. Applications for accreditation are based on a Self-Study Audit describing the program and how it addresses each of the six themes included in the Professional Development of Environmental Educators: Guidelines for Excellence in terms of program design and participant assessment. Because accreditation examines both how the program design is aligned to the Guidelines Themes and how program participants are assessed against those same Guidelines Themes, you will need to provide assessment data for at least two years. New programs should wait to submit their Self-Study until they have at least two years of assessment data. If more than one program is being submitted for accreditation, a separate application should be made for each program.

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NAAEE Publication
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